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Factsheet

  • Agricultural Producers and the Sage-Grouse Recovery Strategy (2015)
    Successful recovery of the Sage-Grouse requires involvement of agricultural producers, local stakeholders and governments at all levels. For its part, the Government of Canada starts with developing a Recovery Strategy. The Recovery Strategy is a planning document that describes current scientific knowledge on threats to species and identifies critical habitat needed for the survival and recovery of the Sage-Grouse. The Recovery Strategy also ide ...
  • Bat and Cave/Karst Researchers and the Emergency Listing Order (2014)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Bats in Buildings and the Emergency Listing Order (2014)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Caving Tourism and the Emergency Listing Order (2014)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Factsheet on the Emergency Listing Order for the Little Brown Myotis, the Northern Myotis and the Tri-colored Bat (2014)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Mining and the Emergency Listing Order (2014)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Wind Energy and the Emergency Listing Order (2014)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Summary Emergency Order – Greater Sage-Grouse (2013)
    The purpose of the Emergency Order for the Protection of the Greater Sage-Grouse is to address the imminent threats to the survival and recovery of the Sage-Grouse to help stabilize the population and begin its recovery. The Government of Canada’s goal is to achieve the best protection for the Greater Sage-Grouse, while minimizing impacts on landowners and agricultural producers. The Emergency Order will come into force on February 18, 2014. The ...
  • Top Questions and Answers Greater Sage-Grouse Emergency Order (2013)
    The purpose of the Emergency Order for the Protection of the Greater Sage-Grouse is to address the imminent threats to the survival and recovery of the Sage-Grouse to help stabilize the population and begin its recovery. The Government of Canada’s goal is to achieve the best protection for the Greater Sage-Grouse, while minimizing impacts on landowners and agricultural producers. The Emergency Order will come into force on February 18, 2014. The ...
  • The Chimney Swift... coming to a chimney near you (2013)
    This brochure was developed for landowners in Quebec. If you live there or in another province and wish to report your observations about Chimney Swifts, please contact your regional Environment Canada office.
  • American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) (2013)
    When American ginseng was first discovered growing in North America in 1715, it set off a lucrative trade business and rapidly became the second most important Canadian export after fur. The roots of ginseng had been used for centuries in traditional Asian medicine, and it was in high demand. Ginseng is still used by many people today in the practice of traditional medicine. Unfortunately, this wild perennial plant has become very rare in Canada ...
  • The Greater Sage-Grouse (2013)
    The Greater Sage-Grouse is a large ground-dwelling bird that has finely marked brown, black, beige and white upper parts, a black belly, and a long pointed tail. It is the largest grouse species found in North America. Within the white breast feathers of the male Greater Sage-Grouse, there are two large air sacs that are inflated and deflated as part of a spectacular mating display.
  • The Boreal Caribou Recovery Strategy - Summary Fact Sheet (2013)
    The Woodland Caribou, Boreal population (“boreal caribou”) is listed as a threatened species under the Species at Risk Act. The final recovery strategy for boreal caribou was published on the Species at Risk Public Registry on October 5, 2012. This fact sheet provides an overview of the boreal caribou recovery strategy, including information on the population and distribution objectives, identification of critical habitat, and the next steps in b ...
  • Amendments to the Authorization Regime under the Species at Risk Act as part of the Responsible Resource Development Plan (2012)
    As part of the Responsible Resource Development plan announced on April 17, 2012, some changes have been made to the Species at Risk Act (SARA) which reduce regulatory burden while strengthening environmental protection.
  • The Piping Plover in Eastern Canada (2010)
    The Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus melodus) is a small, migratory shorebird that breeds on the sandy and stony coastal beaches of Eastern Canada between April and August. The Piping Plover establishes territories, lays eggs and raises young on the open beach between the ocean and dunes. Camouflage is the Piping Plover’s main defence. The sand-coloured adults, chicks and eggs are very difficult to see.

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